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On January 5th, Senator Emilio Álvarez Icaza Longoria presented at the Women’s Museum the conference “Human Rights and Political violence”. He was accompanied by Dr. Gabriela del Valle, Vice President of National Affairs of FEMU and Dr. Guadalupe Valdés, member of our federation.

During his presentation, he gave a historical account of the struggle of the women for their political rights, from Olympe de Gouges in the French Revolution, until the Convention against all Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW).

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The Iranian lawyer Nasrin Sotoudeh has been arrested after she questioned the Iranian judiciary. She is one of the best-known human rights defenders in Iran.

Today we join to demand the liberation of Nasrin together. That’s how it’s done:

  • Write 1-2 sentences to Nasrin and add the hashtag #FREENASRIN. The common hashtag is the most important thing!
  • We all post it on the SAME DAY, WEDNESDAY, at the SAME TIME, 20.30 in Iran18.00 in Brussel, 17.00 London, 12. p.m. North America (Est: 12.00, Gst: 11.00 a.m. & Pst: 9.00 a.m.) 

Last Wednesday, her husband wrote on Facebook that Nasrin Sotoudeh was arrested and sent to Tehran’s Evin Prison. He wrote “Of all the functions that governments of the world are expected to do, the Iranian one is only good in arresting and imprisoning innocent people.” Nasrin Sotoudeh was arrested without an official warrant, because she supported young women in their protest against the hijab.
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The 9th of March 2018 the Iranian Women’s Movement Museum was inaugurated in exile with the exibition “From Evin, with Love”.

This important event took place in Humanity House in Den Haag, the Netherlands.

Curator and founder of the Iranian Women’s Wovement Museum, Mansoureh Shoajee, could together with former Nobel peace prize winner, Shirin Ebadi, welcome a moved public.

The exhibition consists of objects of handicrafts made by political women prisoners in the Evin Prison in Iran, and photos and biographs of these women. Some of the objects are made as gifts to the children of the women, whom they were not able to see during their long time in prison. Some of the women are still prisoners.

The International Association of Women’s Museums was invited to the inauguration, and our president Mona Holm made a speech on behalf of all our members all over the world.

This museum and exhibition is a truly extrordinary achievment. We are so proud of having Shirin Ebadi as the Godmother of our International Association of Women’s Museums, and we support her wish that one day they will be able to open their Women’s Museum also in Teheran.

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“Comfort Women” rally in fron of the Japanese Embassy in Seoul August 2011

The first conference of museums on Japan’s Military “Comfort Women” shows the fundamental role of museums in preserving and uncovering histories for future generations.

In this conference women’s museums together with other museums addressed an important and difficult part of women’s history that is still today denied by the Japanese governmet.

“Comfort women” are called women forced into sexual slavery by the Imperial Japanese Army before and during World War II. The Japanese government has been refusing to acknowledge legal responsibilities for the “comfort women” issue so far.

Our member of the “Women’s active museum on war and peace” took part and sent us the following report of the conference:

 

The First Conference of Museums on Japan’s Military “Comfort Women” Declaration

The world’s first Conference of Museums on Japan’s Military “Comfort Women” convened in the offending nation of Japan with participation from South Korea, China, Taiwan, the Philippines and the United States.

When South Korean “Comfort Woman” victim KIM Hak-sun stepped forward on August 14, 1991 to question the responsibility of the Japanese government, a long history of silence was broken. In the years since, the contours of a vast system of sexual slavery operated by the Japanese military extending to virtually every corner of Asian Pacific territory under the control of its invading forces have become clear as the result of additional testimonies from victims who came forward one after another, coupled with steady progress in historical research.

At the center of the movement have always been the victims themselves bravely raising their voices. From these gentle and strong survivors’ painful but courageous testimonies, overcoming the burden of the trauma from the brutal past sexual violence beyond description, we have learned the meaning of human dignity and courage.

We have been putting pressure on the Japanese government to accept responsibility for these grave violation of women’s rights; however, it wants to distort and forget the past history.  In the face of the Japanese government’s campaign to deny the history, the role of museums has become even more crucial not only for the education our next generation of the values of peace and human rights, but also for the recovery of the survivors.

Sprouted since the latter half of the 1990s, the “Comfort Women” museums will preserve the memory of the survivors of the “Comfort Women” victims.   The Conference of Museums on Japan’s Military “Comfort Women” declares that we shall continue to act in solidarity in order to carry forward to create a peaceful world free from war that respects the human rights of women.

April 1, 2017

Adopted at the First Conference of Museums on Japan’s Military “Comfort Women”

http://wam-peace.org/en/20170406-2/

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