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The National Women’s History Exhibition Hall (NWHEH) is the only museum under the Ministry of Gender Equality & Family. This is one of the important achievements of the Korean women’s movement. It opened on December 9, 2002 in the Women’s Plaza in Daebang-dong, Seoul with the aim to shed light on the role of women in Korean history. The Ministry of Gender Equality & Family wanted to use it as a space for gender equality education, but the Ministry did not have a long-term plan for the Korean women’s history museum. According to the contract between Seoul city and the government, the NWHEH had leased the space in the Women’s Plaza for free for 10 years. Continue reading

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Feminist Pedagogy: Museums, Memorials and Practices of Remembrance
18-20 October 2018
Istanbul

Women’s Museum Istanbul and Sabancı University Gender and Women’s Studies Excellence Center (SU Gender) invite

➢ women’s and gender museums, peace museums and memorials from all over the world working with feminist museum pedagogy and gender-sensible concepts;
➢ activists and institutions working on the history of human rights abuses in a gender-related context;
➢ museum administrators, educators, scholars dealing with the topic “visitor participation” and “creating dialogue among visitors”.

to discuss feminist pedagogical approaches developed to cultivate an alternative culture and alternative practices of remembrance.

Questions to be discussed in particular are:

• Which role does feminist pedagogy play in forming social memory?
• How can new memory practices be designed?
• How can theories, concepts and discussions developed by feminist research and the feminist movement be reflected in the field of social memory?
• What new concepts and debates can be found in this field?
• How do women and gender-oriented museums differ from other museums and places of memory? What is their contribution to cultures of remembrance?
• Which methods can be used to illustrate conflicts, collective and individual violence and war excesses in museums – especially in women’s and gender museums without reproducing images of violence?
• How is the potential of these institutions realized in practice, especially under the aspects of “visitor participation” and “creating dialogue among visitors”.
The conference languages are English and Turkish. Simultaneous translation is provided.

Parallel exhibition Continue reading

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Soroptimist International (SI) is a global volunteer movement with a network of over 75,000 club members in 122 countries, who work at a local, national and international level to Educate, Empower and Enable opportunities for women and girls.

SI’s United Nations representatives advocate for human rights and gender equality at six United Nations Centres utilising evidence provided by grassroots Soroptimist projects, and direct action taken at the local level, to ensure that the voices of women and girls are heard worldwide.

 

 

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We are happy to welcome a new member in IAWM: The initiative ‘Women for Kazachstan‘!

The non-governmental-organization will open the first Women’s Museum in Kazachstan. Even though they do not yet have a physical space, the initaitive is already very active: many exhibitions have been organized, the collection is growing, research is progress, and an online magazine on Facebook gives insight to the museums topics. We hope you can continue your good work and wish all the best!

 

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The two volumes of “Feminism and Museums” are edited by Jenna Ashton and published by MuseumsEtc. They include not only an article called “Women’s Museums: Hubs for Feminism” written by our coordinator Astrid Schönweger, but many insightful chapters of our member museums. Continue reading

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The voluntary organisation “Frammenti di storia al femminile” was founded in Cossano Canavese, Italy in 1998. From its beginnings it was a solid and vibrant center for women’s culture collecting, keeping and spreading  aural, written and artefact-based women’s memory. The foundation of a women’s museum is one of the goals of the organisation.

The inspiration of the organisation is the exceptional Giulia Avetta, born in 1908 in Cossano, who dedicated her life to other people.

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The Musée de la Femme Henriette Bathily was inaugurated as a tribute to all women in Gorée on June 17, 1994.

The museum was founded by the Consortium of Audiovisual Communications in Africa (CCA), led by Annette Mbaye D’Erneville, supported by a group of scientists, historians and sociologists. It contributes to education, liberation, emancipation, moral and scientific arming of all Senegalese women on the paths of development.

Annette Mbaye d’Erneville

The founder of the museum Annette Mbaye d’Erneville has not only founded the first African women’s museum, but also inspired others to do the same. Mali and Central Africa followed her example. The Canadian WM was founded by her niece. „Tata-Annette“ (aunt) or „Mere-bi“ (mother), as she is called, shows us how one single woman is able to change the world. As first female journalist in Senegal she worked for the emancipation of women for all her life. She founded the first women’s magazine and several women’s organizations, as well as the first film festival in Senegal. She was deeply involved in the development of her country. For her achievements she received the first IAWM award during the Fifth International Congress of Women’s Museum in Mexico City in 2016.

The prize was donated by the Soroptimist Clubs of Vaduz (LI), Zug (CH), Goldes (A), and Meran (I). From left to right: Christine Peer (SI International Europe), Astrid Schönweger, coordinator of IAWM, Monika Studer, SI Club Vaduz, Mona Holm, president of IAWM, Lydie Olga Ntap, WM Canada, Sissi Prader, WM Merano, Italy.

At first sight, the creation of a women’s museum might seem like a useless fantasy; but if we think about it, we know that women are at the center of all community life. Through them the life and the future of a whole community is influenced. Then the interest in a women’s museum does not have to be justified.

For 20 Years, the women’s museum was located on the island of Gorée. This original Museum was the first of its kind on the African continent. Up until today it presents its collections which illustrate all the phases of the life of Senegalese rural and urban women.

The main objective of the Henriette Bathily Women’s Museum is to unveil the place and the role of the Senegalese women in their communities, rituals, and popular and traditional arts.It opens up new point of views through field research, interviews, family collections, photographic reproductions, recordings and films, and archival consultations. The Museum’s magazines will attract the interest of nationals and foreigners and introduce them to an important aspect of Senegalese community life: the organization of society evolves around women. Another interest of the Senegalese Women’s Museum is that it allows non-Senegalese to enter the “intimacy” of the Senegalese society either for research, studies, academic work or simply to get to know the other. The Senegalese can themselves discover the specificities of other ethnic groups, of other communities, of other regions: customs and traditions varying between groups. In short, the Senegalese Women’s Museum, while being an educational and cultural structure is also a socio-economic organization.

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The women’s museum in Fürth, Germany is led by women who speak different mother tongues who have different academic, pedagogical and artistic professions. In 1989 they founded the association Frauen in der Einen Welt – Zentrum für interkulturelle Frauenalltagsforschung und internationalen Austausch e.V. (Women in One World – Center for Intercultural Research of Women’s Everyday Life and International Exchange), under which they express their solidarity with women worldwide, the need for discussion, cooperation and learning from each other. They develop projects aimed at intercultural understanding based on the everyday experience of women. They create a framework in which women from different cultural backgrounds can confidently share, compare and connect their experiences.

The association founded the Museum Frauenkultur Regional-International (Museum Women’s Culture Regional – International) in 2006. There they create and organize exhibitions, conferences, publish books and catalogues.

Common and shared experiences, as well as differences between women worldwide, who are disputing patriarchal structures, inequality and injustice are subject of the exhibitions, always with the aim of initiating intercultural and transcultural dialogues.

Through an interdisciplinary approach and a female perspective, they introduce an alternative interpretation of known issues in museums and initiate discussions about the problems left behind. They are addressing difficult topics and dissonant heritage. They report the experience of individuals in the wider social processes. They take women’s everyday life seriously and acknowledge the day-to-day performance of women. They relate situations of women from different countries, cultures and social classes and visualize mutual dependencies from Franconia, the region where the museum is situated, to everywhere. Thy are “giving voice” to ordinary women and highlight their histories.

They collaborate with women’s research organizations, women’s museums, authors and artists from various countries and are part of IAWM – International Association of Women’s Museums. In 1993 and 2014 the organization and the Museum have been awarded for the advancement of women in Nuremberg.

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The Museo de la Mujer Mexico has the objective of reviewing Mexico’s history with a gender approach, from the prehispanic era to the present, with the aim of making visible women’s work and their contribution to building the nation, so that the history of women in Mexico ceases to be forgotten.

The Women’s Museum is an open book to the citizens: a center for the diffusion of a new culture of equity and respect of women’s human rights.

The museum wants to raise awareness that women’s development is pivotal to achieve the overall progress of humanity, since women are not only reproducers of life, but they also reproduce cultural patterns. The Mexican Federation of University Women (FEMU) has advocated for affirmative policies to generate a new culture of peace through teaching, research and dissemination of a gender-sensitive culture. The best investment that a nation can make is in women and girl’s education, because of the multiplying effect they have among society. People can go as far as their education allows them.

Inside the building of the University Print House the Women’s Museum Mexico is displaying women’s history in 8 rooms:

ROOM 1: EQUITY, UNIVERSAL PRINCIPLE OF HARMONY

“The female is a product of nature, and the woman is a product of civilization” Alfonso Karr, slogan of the 1st Feminist Congress in Mexico, held in Mérida, Yucatán, 1970

ROOM 2: DUAL COSMIC VIEW OF ANCIENT MEXICO

“Listen, this is the time to learn here on Earth, this is the word: Heed, and from here you will take what your life will be, what you will be made of. Through a difficult place we walk, we are here on Earth. For one part an abysm, for the other, a ravine. If you don’t walk through the middle you will fall one way or another. Only in the middle one lives, only in the middle one walks.” Huehuehtlatolli, Advice from a father to a daughter

ROOM 3: NEW SPANISH MARIANISM. WOMEN AT HOME

“And for this God did not create Eve from Adam’s head, for she must know that she is no greater than her husband, neither did He make her from his foot, for she must know that woman is no less than her husband; but He made her from the middle of his ribs, so they both would know that they are equal and must encounter peace with each other.” Pedro de Córdoba, Christian Doctrine, 1544

ROOM 4: WOMEN INSURGENTS

“If we are now in the enlightened years, when everyone can speak their own minds; if everyone writes what they think, what they want, what they know or that they can; if that splendid day of the oath of our Independence has the merit of the applause of the sage, the ignorant, the rich, the poor, the child, the old, the noble and the commoner, how is it that this cannot be done by women, to whom Heaven gave, as to any other living being, their thinking brains.” María Josefa Guelberdi, 1821

ROOM 5: FREEDOM AND EDUCATION

“From the very first days of the world, the most painful, the most terrible curse weighted on women: oppression.” Laureana Wright, Women’s emancipation through education, 1891

ROOM 6: FROM TEACHERS TO REVOLUTIONARIES 

“[…] It is time for Mexican Women to recognize that their rights and obligations go further than the home.” Dolores Jiménez y Muro, September 11th, 1910

ROOM 7: WOMEN’S CITIZENSHIP

“The Mexican woman who has not excluded herself from the active part of the revolution , should not be excluded from the political part [..] the road to her dignity, from where a great part of the meaning of homeland comes from.” Hermila Galindo, speech for the request of the vote before the Constituent Congress, 1916.

ROOM 8: FROM THE FEMINIST REVOLUTION TO THE PRESENT TIME

“We are practically encountering a world revolution with great sociopolitical and economic repercussions; a sui generis revolution, the female way, without blood or violence, bold and at the same time discrete, soft and subtle, but firm and decisive, and most important, without winners or losers, which has been shaking and revolutionizing the sturdy structure of the social organization that placed women in a markedly humiliating inferior condition.” María Lavalle Urbina, Speech of the first woman Chair of the Senate, December 15th, 1965.

Website: http://www.museodelamujer.org.mx/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100010830939275

 

 

 

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