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foto Marit Bye Gjermshus

What’s happening on and around the International Women’s Day in Kongsvinger 2018?

The Norwegian Women’s Museum, Kvinnemuseet, is an active part in the IWD committee in our town, Kongsvinger. This is the third year we are inviting several other organizations to join the celebration to raise awareness on feminist issues in our community.

We have opted, not to have one Women’s Day, but several! There will be feminist activities happening in Kongsvinger from 1st to 11th of March. On the 1st of March, there will be a philosophical café, focusing on the #metoo-campaign, at the library, and there will also be a quiz, with questions from Women’s culture and history.

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Tonight the association women and gender museum Switzerland invites to a talk with the title ‘Significant Swiss Women – how to honour them? From the classical museum to the Virtual Reality’.

The exhibition curator Beat Gugger will address the following questions: How can important Swiss Women and their achievements be represented for the future? Should we open a women’s museum, like women in other countries did? Or are there other possibilities through digitalization? Continue reading

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HERSTORYMUSEUM is a fictional museum founded by artist María María Acha-Kutscher in 2017. Its aim is to show a history of art through a global archive of female artists.

The project turns the artists’ portraits with their works into pictograms. A visual language that reminds us one of the first communication forms in history of humankind. The museum also expands to other circuits different from the art system, like the Internet and public spaces through murals.

HERSTORYMUSEUM adds to the large list of museums created by artists to display impossible worlds or question the status quo of art and join to other initiatives that fight against the invisibility of women artists, to build an inclusive panorama. HERSTORYMUSEUM includes also a narrative that moves away from the concept of “the genius figure” imposed by the patriarchal system, to give access to other ways of doing and seeing art.

Website: www.herstorymuseum.org

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60 years ago in 1957 an all women tourist group set out from Alice Springs to Ayers Rock. To celebrate this anniversary SEIT Outback, a member of the women’s museum in Alice Springs, organizes the “Petticoat Safari Tour” from 20-23 October 2017. In this reenactment of the original journey the travellers are invited to journey on off road tracks, camp under the stars on Aboriginal lands and relive the trip of these pioneering and brave women.

http://pioneerwomen.com.au/learn/news-events/join-the-petticoat-safari-tour-1957-reenactment

 

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The HerStory Archive at the National Pioneer Women’s Hall of Fame is a comprehensive collection of stories and photographs.

It shows mainly pioneering women in the traditional sense or those who are first in their field.  Apart from preserving many often previously untold stories, the archive is useful for future researchers, as well as inspiration for future exhibitions at National Pioneer Women’s Hall of Fame headquarters in Alice Springs and online. The information comes from many avenues: from the staff and volunteer research and from information supplied by visitors, authors, scholars and friends and family of the pioneer women. In the current upgrade of the archive, the staff is working towards updating basic information, attaching photos and providing additional information on each of the women in the Archive. There will also be sound and audio-visual material for a small selection of the women.  As part of the upgrade, the online Archive will be more user-friendly and easier to search. The upgraded Archive will be available for visitors to browse at the museum or on the webpage.

http://pioneerwomen.com.au/collection/herstory-archive

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The Natinal Pioneer Women’s Hall of Fame in Alice Springs, Australia is opening a new part of the permanent exhibition “What’s Work Worth” on Thursday, 21st September 2017.

The newly-added audio and audio-visual material draws, in part, on the experiences of women and men from all walks of life in Alice Springs to continue the discussion around attitudes and perceptions to women’s paid and unpaid work and ideas on how museums represent work, particularly women’s work, gender and objects.

What’s Work Worth?” takes a broad look at Australian women’s experiences of work.  It explores this through ordinary, everyday objects.  It poses two sets of questions. First: though women’s work has changed dramatically in the last few decades, has it increased women’s worth?  Was the fight for equality a radical or, as Germaine Greer has argued, a profoundly conservative act?  Second: How do our ideas about gender mediate how we view objects?  How do the objects we like, hate, use, own or don’t own, “gender” us?  If it is true that children are conditioned by the objects they play with, is it possible that adults are also conditioned by the objects they use?

http://pioneerwomen.com.au/explore-exhibitions/womens-work

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