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In times when many museums worldwide are forced to keep their doors shut, we invite you to engage with exhibitions and collections of women’s museums virtually. Every day we will share with you an online exhibition or virtual view into one of our member museums worldwide.

Global Fund for Women presents: Fundamental. Gender Justice. No Exceptions.

For those of you spending more time indoors these days, or in need of an educational tool around gender justice, consider catching up on Fundamental: Gender Justice. No Exceptions. This five episode short film series is a character-driven documentary from Global Fund for Women and directed by two-time Academy Award-winner Sharmeen Obaid-Chinoy. Each episode shines a light on grassroots activists and community organizers who are fighting for gender justice and disrupting the status quo. The groups in this series, and others like them, are at the front lines of responding to crisis in their communities and building leadership and solidarity. Continue reading

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Global Fund for Women updated the Call for Applications for the Adolescent Girls Advisory Council:

We have noticed a general interest from girls around the world to join the Adolescent Girls Advisory Council! Although the call was initially limited to the Caribbean, Middle East and North Africa, and Sub-Saharan Africa (Francophone and Portuguese-Speaking countries), as a program we have decided to open the call to other regions in the Global South and Global East. We are now accepting applications from 10-17-year-old girls from the following regions: Asia Pacific, Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean, the Middle East and North Africa, and Sub-Saharan Africa.  

As such, changes have been made to the initial call for applications. The submission deadline has been extended to November 25, 2019.

The girl advisors will play a critical role in helping us shape our adolescent girls’ rights strategy and we look forward to piloting a participatory grantmaking model where the girls will meaningfully participate in decision-making. The nine girl advisors will be instrumental in finding, funding, and amplifying girl-led groups and movements.

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As the International Association of Women’s Museums (IAWM) we would like to send a warm welcome to the new President and CEO of Global Fund for Women, Latanya Mapp Frett. We wish you much strength and success for your important work with Global Fund for Women!

As network we are grateful about the successful collaboration between Global Fund for Women and IAWM over the last years, especially since Global Fund for Women is represented on the Board of IAWM through Catherine King. We are looking forward to future collaborations and networking and wish Latanya Mapp Frett all the best!

First 30 Days: Video and Letter from Latanya Mapp Frett, Global Fund for Women’s President and CEO

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Thousands of people gathered in protest marches for women’s rights around the world on 19th January 2019. For the third time, the Women’s March took place in Washington, London, Berlin, Rome and many other cities around the world. We asked Kara Wuest from Global Fund for Women a few questions about the Women’s March:

What were the outcomes of the first Women’s March?

The first Women’s March in January 2017 was a direct response to Donald Trump’s inauguration, and the gathering in Washington DC wound up being the largest one-day protest in US history. It was a time to bring all people together who wanted to speak out about women’s rights, racial equality, and LGBTQ freedom. The second Women’s March in January 2018 captured the messages of #MeToo and the urgency of the upcoming mid-term elections in the United States – a call to action that helped get the largest amount of women to the US Congress than ever before.

What is this Women’s March about?

In the Bay Area, the themes were „Truth to Power“ and „Women’s Wave.“ Our CEO and President Musimbi Kanyoro spoke at the San Francisco march about the global connections of women’s movements and the need to move forward together in solidarity.

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Global Fund for Women’s President and CEO, Dr. Musimbi Kanyoro, delivered an inspiring TED Talk for International Women’s Day.

Isirika. It’s one word with a meaning powerful enough to mobilize and inspire an entire community.

Global Fund for Women’s President and CEO, Dr. Musimbi Kanyoro’s new TED Talk was just released for International Women’s Day! It’s time to embrace isirika – a Maragoli word that means ‘caring, together, for one another’ or equal generosity – and help make a real difference for women around the world.

 

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In many regions of Uganda, rural women live below the poverty line, and food is scarce. Women must work on farms simply to keep enough food on the table to feed their families.

With the goal of empowering rural women and helping to address these needs, Action for Rural Women’s Empowerment (ARUWE) was founded in 2000 in Kampala. It offered courses to rural women about food security, income generation, health, literacy, and more—critical issues for women in the region, who had few resources available to them.

“The rural women had issues that were inhibiting them from actively participating in their social development,” says Agnes Mirembe, Action for Rural Women’s Empowerment’s current Programs Manager. 

But when the organization began, it had little funding and no international support.

Fast forward to today, 13 years after ARUWE received its first grant from Global Fund for Women in 2004: ARUWE now helps many communities within the central and north-eastern regions of Uganda. In addition to offering trainings on organic sustainability farming and business management, ARUWE teaches the rural women it works with about their rights—health, land, and economic rights.

“Some of the women we are working with have just finished voting election exercises, and we have two that are working on local level councils,” explains Agnes. “There they can represent and talk about the issues that the women are really struggling with. It’s a beautiful thing to have leaders come out of the people that we are working with.”

Learn more about ARUWE’S work

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