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The Musée de la Femme Henriette Bathily was inaugurated as a tribute to all women in Gorée on June 17, 1994.

The museum was founded by the Consortium of Audiovisual Communications in Africa (CCA), led by Annette Mbaye D’Erneville, supported by a group of scientists, historians and sociologists. It contributes to education, liberation, emancipation, moral and scientific arming of all Senegalese women on the paths of development.

Annette Mbaye d’Erneville

The founder of the museum Annette Mbaye d’Erneville has not only founded the first African women’s museum, but also inspired others to do the same. Mali and Central Africa followed her example. The Canadian WM was founded by her niece. „Tata-Annette“ (aunt) or „Mere-bi“ (mother), as she is called, shows us how one single woman is able to change the world. As first female journalist in Senegal she worked for the emancipation of women for all her life. She founded the first women’s magazine and several women’s organizations, as well as the first film festival in Senegal. She was deeply involved in the development of her country. For her achievements she received the first IAWM award during the Fifth International Congress of Women’s Museum in Mexico City in 2016.

The prize was donated by the Soroptimist Clubs of Vaduz (LI), Zug (CH), Goldes (A), and Meran (I). From left to right: Christine Peer (SI International Europe), Astrid Schönweger, coordinator of IAWM, Monika Studer, SI Club Vaduz, Mona Holm, president of IAWM, Lydie Olga Ntap, WM Canada, Sissi Prader, WM Merano, Italy.

At first sight, the creation of a women’s museum might seem like a useless fantasy; but if we think about it, we know that women are at the center of all community life. Through them the life and the future of a whole community is influenced. Then the interest in a women’s museum does not have to be justified.

For 20 Years, the women’s museum was located on the island of Gorée. This original Museum was the first of its kind on the African continent. Up until today it presents its collections which illustrate all the phases of the life of Senegalese rural and urban women.

The main objective of the Henriette Bathily Women’s Museum is to unveil the place and the role of the Senegalese women in their communities, rituals, and popular and traditional arts.It opens up new point of views through field research, interviews, family collections, photographic reproductions, recordings and films, and archival consultations. The Museum’s magazines will attract the interest of nationals and foreigners and introduce them to an important aspect of Senegalese community life: the organization of society evolves around women. Another interest of the Senegalese Women’s Museum is that it allows non-Senegalese to enter the “intimacy” of the Senegalese society either for research, studies, academic work or simply to get to know the other. The Senegalese can themselves discover the specificities of other ethnic groups, of other communities, of other regions: customs and traditions varying between groups. In short, the Senegalese Women’s Museum, while being an educational and cultural structure is also a socio-economic organization.

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The Natinal Pioneer Women’s Hall of Fame in Alice Springs, Australia is opening a new part of the permanent exhibition “What’s Work Worth” on Thursday, 21st September 2017.

The newly-added audio and audio-visual material draws, in part, on the experiences of women and men from all walks of life in Alice Springs to continue the discussion around attitudes and perceptions to women’s paid and unpaid work and ideas on how museums represent work, particularly women’s work, gender and objects.

What’s Work Worth?” takes a broad look at Australian women’s experiences of work.  It explores this through ordinary, everyday objects.  It poses two sets of questions. First: though women’s work has changed dramatically in the last few decades, has it increased women’s worth?  Was the fight for equality a radical or, as Germaine Greer has argued, a profoundly conservative act?  Second: How do our ideas about gender mediate how we view objects?  How do the objects we like, hate, use, own or don’t own, “gender” us?  If it is true that children are conditioned by the objects they play with, is it possible that adults are also conditioned by the objects they use?

http://pioneerwomen.com.au/explore-exhibitions/womens-work

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The women’s museum in Fürth, Germany is led by women who speak different mother tongues who have different academic, pedagogical and artistic professions. In 1989 they founded the association Frauen in der Einen Welt – Zentrum für interkulturelle Frauenalltagsforschung und internationalen Austausch e.V. (Women in One World – Center for Intercultural Research of Women’s Everyday Life and International Exchange), under which they express their solidarity with women worldwide, the need for discussion, cooperation and learning from each other. They develop projects aimed at intercultural understanding based on the everyday experience of women. They create a framework in which women from different cultural backgrounds can confidently share, compare and connect their experiences.

The association founded the Museum Frauenkultur Regional-International (Museum Women’s Culture Regional – International) in 2006. There they create and organize exhibitions, conferences, publish books and catalogues.

Common and shared experiences, as well as differences between women worldwide, who are disputing patriarchal structures, inequality and injustice are subject of the exhibitions, always with the aim of initiating intercultural and transcultural dialogues.

Through an interdisciplinary approach and a female perspective, they introduce an alternative interpretation of known issues in museums and initiate discussions about the problems left behind. They are addressing difficult topics and dissonant heritage. They report the experience of individuals in the wider social processes. They take women’s everyday life seriously and acknowledge the day-to-day performance of women. They relate situations of women from different countries, cultures and social classes and visualize mutual dependencies from Franconia, the region where the museum is situated, to everywhere. Thy are “giving voice” to ordinary women and highlight their histories.

They collaborate with women’s research organizations, women’s museums, authors and artists from various countries and are part of IAWM – International Association of Women’s Museums. In 1993 and 2014 the organization and the Museum have been awarded for the advancement of women in Nuremberg.

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The National Pioneer Women’s Hall of Fame was founded in 1993, and is one of two women’s museums in Australia. It is dedicated to preserving the place of women in history for their special contribution to Australia’s heritage.

The three main permanent exhibitions include photographs and stories of the courage, endurance and resilience of pioneering Central Australian women, an exhibition exploring how women’s working worlds have changed and how museums represent this, and a collection of over a hundred stories of women who were the very first in Australia in her chosen field of endeavour.

 

http://pioneerwomen.com.au/

https://www.facebook.com/NPWHF

https://www.instagram.com/npwhf_alicesprings  

 

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Girl Museum is the first and only museum in the world dedicated to celebrating girls.  Founded in 2009, the museum is entirely virtual – all programs are available on the website, free and open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

The museum is run by Head Girl, Ashley E. Remer, and a dedicated team of volunteers from around the world.  As a lover of museums, Ashley saw that girls were frequently left out of museum narratives – and wanted to give girls and their stories a place to call home. 

Girl Museum believes girls are the key to a brighter, better future and that girls deserve to have a museum of their own.  This virtual space seeks to document, preserve, and present girls’ history and culture while empowering girls to lead healthy, happy lives.  The museum also produces pop-up events and exhibitions around the world to advocate for girls.

The objects in the collection range from contributed artworks and stories to Creative Commons licensed material from museums around the world. The exhibits take these objects and stories to showcase the real lives of girls in the past and present – highlighting their triumphs, struggles, and heroism to advocate for gender equality. 

The museum also produces participatory projects and a podcast series, and provides internships and ways to advocate for girls and girls’ rights – fostering a community dedicated to transforming the world through girl power. 

Website: www.girlmuseum.org

 

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GirlMuseum

 

Twitter: http://twitter.com/girlmuseum

 

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/girlmuseum/

 

Podcast: http://girlmuseum.podbean.org

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Gül Aydin is a Museum Studies Master student at Dokuz Eylül University in Turkey. For a while she has been in contact with the Women’s Museum Istanbul and took part in the Women’s Museums conference in Istanbul in October 2016. Through the close collaboration between women’s museums she got the possibility to do an internship at the Women’s Museum Museum Frauenkultur Regional-International in Fürth, Germany. We are delighted that young women and museology students bring so much interest and enthusiasm to women’s museums!

In this video Gül Aydin speaks about her new museological experiences:

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The Museo de la Mujer Mexico has the objective of reviewing Mexico’s history with a gender approach, from the prehispanic era to the present, with the aim of making visible women’s work and their contribution to building the nation, so that the history of women in Mexico ceases to be forgotten.

The Women’s Museum is an open book to the citizens: a center for the diffusion of a new culture of equity and respect of women’s human rights.

The museum wants to raise awareness that women’s development is pivotal to achieve the overall progress of humanity, since women are not only reproducers of life, but they also reproduce cultural patterns. The Mexican Federation of University Women (FEMU) has advocated for affirmative policies to generate a new culture of peace through teaching, research and dissemination of a gender-sensitive culture. The best investment that a nation can make is in women and girl’s education, because of the multiplying effect they have among society. People can go as far as their education allows them.

Inside the building of the University Print House the Women’s Museum Mexico is displaying women’s history in 8 rooms:

ROOM 1: EQUITY, UNIVERSAL PRINCIPLE OF HARMONY

“The female is a product of nature, and the woman is a product of civilization” Alfonso Karr, slogan of the 1st Feminist Congress in Mexico, held in Mérida, Yucatán, 1970

ROOM 2: DUAL COSMIC VIEW OF ANCIENT MEXICO

“Listen, this is the time to learn here on Earth, this is the word: Heed, and from here you will take what your life will be, what you will be made of. Through a difficult place we walk, we are here on Earth. For one part an abysm, for the other, a ravine. If you don’t walk through the middle you will fall one way or another. Only in the middle one lives, only in the middle one walks.” Huehuehtlatolli, Advice from a father to a daughter

ROOM 3: NEW SPANISH MARIANISM. WOMEN AT HOME

“And for this God did not create Eve from Adam’s head, for she must know that she is no greater than her husband, neither did He make her from his foot, for she must know that woman is no less than her husband; but He made her from the middle of his ribs, so they both would know that they are equal and must encounter peace with each other.” Pedro de Córdoba, Christian Doctrine, 1544

ROOM 4: WOMEN INSURGENTS

“If we are now in the enlightened years, when everyone can speak their own minds; if everyone writes what they think, what they want, what they know or that they can; if that splendid day of the oath of our Independence has the merit of the applause of the sage, the ignorant, the rich, the poor, the child, the old, the noble and the commoner, how is it that this cannot be done by women, to whom Heaven gave, as to any other living being, their thinking brains.” María Josefa Guelberdi, 1821

ROOM 5: FREEDOM AND EDUCATION

“From the very first days of the world, the most painful, the most terrible curse weighted on women: oppression.” Laureana Wright, Women’s emancipation through education, 1891

ROOM 6: FROM TEACHERS TO REVOLUTIONARIES 

“[…] It is time for Mexican Women to recognize that their rights and obligations go further than the home.” Dolores Jiménez y Muro, September 11th, 1910

ROOM 7: WOMEN’S CITIZENSHIP

“The Mexican woman who has not excluded herself from the active part of the revolution , should not be excluded from the political part [..] the road to her dignity, from where a great part of the meaning of homeland comes from.” Hermila Galindo, speech for the request of the vote before the Constituent Congress, 1916.

ROOM 8: FROM THE FEMINIST REVOLUTION TO THE PRESENT TIME

“We are practically encountering a world revolution with great sociopolitical and economic repercussions; a sui generis revolution, the female way, without blood or violence, bold and at the same time discrete, soft and subtle, but firm and decisive, and most important, without winners or losers, which has been shaking and revolutionizing the sturdy structure of the social organization that placed women in a markedly humiliating inferior condition.” María Lavalle Urbina, Speech of the first woman Chair of the Senate, December 15th, 1965.

Website: http://www.museodelamujer.org.mx/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100010830939275

 

 

 

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…a catalyst for gender equality in civic statues in the UK

The inVISIBLEwomen website launched in March 2016 at the Women of the World Festival on the Southbank in London, UK. Shockingly, only an estimated 15% of civic statues in the UK honour women so the site invites you to take part in building a statistical picture of the situation nationally.  Successful campaigning methods are highlighted and successes, both past and present are celebrated with an eye on the possibilities for the future.

To paraphrase our suffragette sisters in their struggle for votes for women, it is time for more PLINTHS FOR WOMEN!

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Interested in girls’ lifes around the globe? The Girl Museum recently published the latest edition of the newsletter Girl News International, a wonderful source of information about girls worldwide.

This is the letter from the editor, Ashley Remer, to the latest edition:

This issue is a wild one—things that I never thought would happen, let alone read in print. It seems truth is continually stranger and infinitely more disturbing than fiction. However, there are also amazing stories of hope and overcoming obstacles to reaffirm your knowledge that girls are more than just survivors, they are conquerors.

I hope you are inspired and enraged in equal measures.

With strength and hope,

Ashley E. Remer
Editor

And here you can read and subscribe: http://paper.li/e-1478952107#/

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Member of IAWM since its foundation in 2009.

The Museo de las Mujeres Costa Rica exists since 2009 and is administrated by Claudia Mandel Katz and her family. The rooms are spreading over 50 sqm on the last upper floor and terrace of their own house in San José, Costa Rica. They receive groups of students from public universities which are interested in gender topics to see their permanent collection.

The objects in their exhibition range are paintings, sculptures, photographs and objects donated by artists around female specific topics. Their research section is particularly interesting, where they share research from authors from different countries and disciplines who share a feminist approach to their research topics.

The women’s museum Costa Rica is considered not only as a place to look at, but as a place to experience, to discuss in workshops and meetings. It concentrates in topics such as stereotypes and female identity, gender violence and works with various communities in Costa Rica.

  1. Photography workshops “Self-portrait through objects” with support from the Joint Institute for Social Aid and INAMU. Participants: women of three communities: Paraíso de Cartago, Santa Lucia de Heredia and Cartago Oreamuno.

March 8, 2010. International Women’s Day. Presentation of the art exhibition and conference by Elia Arce. Culture Center in Greece, Costa Rica.

March 17, 2011. Presentation of the results of the Economic Project: “Focusing on Latin America” by the International Women’s Museum, San Francisco USA (IMOW). Culture Center in Greece, Costa Rica.

November 22, 2011. Award Ceremony of the First National Photography Competition “Zero Violence against women” in UNED with sponsorship of Banco Popular.

 

The Museum of Women of Costa Rica also participates and supports International Cooperation Projects

Participation and support for the IV Congress of Gender Studies Network in Northern Mexico in the borders of violence: theoretical and methodological approaches, reflections, experiences and policies. México, Baja California, November 23, 2012

2012 Participation in the Exhibition of Photography “Yesterday and Today of Women” organized by the Museum of Women of Argentina for International Human Rights Day, group show.

2013 Museums platform virtual courses Argentina- México- Costa Rica.

Since 2015 the Museum of Women of Costa Rica coordinates with the University of Costa Rica the project Women in the Patriarchal Society. This is a proposal that seeks to permeate the consciousness of various social groups in favor of the value of women in society. This is an initiative of the Museum of Women, which gets to work through students of the School of Philosophy at the University of Costa Rica. See article in this link: http://accionsocial.ucr.ac.cr/noticias/adolescentes-reflexionan-violencia-contra-mujeres

2015 Workshop at SIFAIS, La Carpio, San José, Costa Rica. TC-644 “Art and women in patriarchal society”.

2015 Workshop at Anastasio Alfaro College. TCU-644 “Art and women in patriarchal society”.

2015 Workshop at Vargas Calvo College. TCU-644 “Art and women in patriarchal society”.

Website: museodelasmujeres.co.cr

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Museo-de-las-Mujeres-129097077196024/

Current Virtual Exhibition: Luz Darriba, multidisciplinary artist

http://museodelasmujeres.co.cr/2016/10/luz-darriba-artista-multidisciplinar/

Luz Darriba. La sangre de las mariposas

 

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