fb index Twitter_logo_4

The voluntary organisation “Frammenti di storia al femminile” was founded in Cossano Canavese, Italy in 1998. From its beginnings it was a solid and vibrant center for women’s culture collecting, keeping and spreading  aural, written and artefact-based women’s memory. The foundation of a women’s museum is one of the goals of the organisation.

The inspiration of the organisation is the exceptional Giulia Avetta, born in 1908 in Cossano, who dedicated her life to other people.

Continue reading

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinteresttumblr

Europe’s first women’s museum presents women’s art and history internationally and in an interdisciplinary manner. The exhibitions here are the result of current discussions and research findings. The role of women in society, from matriarchal prehistoric times to the present, is depicted in a lively way.

Continue reading

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinteresttumblr

HERSTORYMUSEUM is a fictional museum founded by artist María María Acha-Kutscher in 2017. Its aim is to show a history of art through a global archive of female artists.

The project turns the artists’ portraits with their works into pictograms. A visual language that reminds us one of the first communication forms in history of humankind. The museum also expands to other circuits different from the art system, like the Internet and public spaces through murals.

HERSTORYMUSEUM adds to the large list of museums created by artists to display impossible worlds or question the status quo of art and join to other initiatives that fight against the invisibility of women artists, to build an inclusive panorama. HERSTORYMUSEUM includes also a narrative that moves away from the concept of “the genius figure” imposed by the patriarchal system, to give access to other ways of doing and seeing art.

Website: www.herstorymuseum.org

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinteresttumblr

60 years ago in 1957 an all women tourist group set out from Alice Springs to Ayers Rock. To celebrate this anniversary SEIT Outback, a member of the women’s museum in Alice Springs, organizes the “Petticoat Safari Tour” from 20-23 October 2017. In this reenactment of the original journey the travellers are invited to journey on off road tracks, camp under the stars on Aboriginal lands and relive the trip of these pioneering and brave women.

http://pioneerwomen.com.au/learn/news-events/join-the-petticoat-safari-tour-1957-reenactment

 

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinteresttumblr

The HerStory Archive at the National Pioneer Women’s Hall of Fame is a comprehensive collection of stories and photographs.

It shows mainly pioneering women in the traditional sense or those who are first in their field.  Apart from preserving many often previously untold stories, the archive is useful for future researchers, as well as inspiration for future exhibitions at National Pioneer Women’s Hall of Fame headquarters in Alice Springs and online. The information comes from many avenues: from the staff and volunteer research and from information supplied by visitors, authors, scholars and friends and family of the pioneer women. In the current upgrade of the archive, the staff is working towards updating basic information, attaching photos and providing additional information on each of the women in the Archive. There will also be sound and audio-visual material for a small selection of the women.  As part of the upgrade, the online Archive will be more user-friendly and easier to search. The upgraded Archive will be available for visitors to browse at the museum or on the webpage.

http://pioneerwomen.com.au/collection/herstory-archive

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinteresttumblr

The new exhibition at the Das Verborgene Museum in Berlin tells stories of female wartime photographers in Europe. It opens on Wednesday 27 September 2017.

Between 1914 and 1945, during the two international wars of aggression and the Spanish Civil War, women took part as war correspondents, whether as professional photographers and journalists, or as amateur photographers or nurses with cameras. They witnessed the care of the wounded in fi eld hospitals, troop entertainments at base and military confl ict along the lines, just as they recorded life at home on the domestic front.

28 September 2017 – 28 February 2018

berlin@dasverborgenemuseum.de
www.dasverborgenemuseum.de

das_verborgene_museum_kriegsfotografinnen_eMail

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinteresttumblr

The Musée de la Femme Henriette Bathily was inaugurated as a tribute to all women in Gorée on June 17, 1994.

The museum was founded by the Consortium of Audiovisual Communications in Africa (CCA), led by Annette Mbaye D’Erneville, supported by a group of scientists, historians and sociologists. It contributes to education, liberation, emancipation, moral and scientific arming of all Senegalese women on the paths of development.

Annette Mbaye d’Erneville

The founder of the museum Annette Mbaye d’Erneville has not only founded the first African women’s museum, but also inspired others to do the same. Mali and Central Africa followed her example. The Canadian WM was founded by her niece. „Tata-Annette“ (aunt) or „Mere-bi“ (mother), as she is called, shows us how one single woman is able to change the world. As first female journalist in Senegal she worked for the emancipation of women for all her life. She founded the first women’s magazine and several women’s organizations, as well as the first film festival in Senegal. She was deeply involved in the development of her country. For her achievements she received the first IAWM award during the Fifth International Congress of Women’s Museum in Mexico City in 2016.

The prize was donated by the Soroptimist Clubs of Vaduz (LI), Zug (CH), Goldes (A), and Meran (I). From left to right: Christine Peer (SI International Europe), Astrid Schönweger, coordinator of IAWM, Monika Studer, SI Club Vaduz, Mona Holm, president of IAWM, Lydie Olga Ntap, WM Canada, Sissi Prader, WM Merano, Italy.

At first sight, the creation of a women’s museum might seem like a useless fantasy; but if we think about it, we know that women are at the center of all community life. Through them the life and the future of a whole community is influenced. Then the interest in a women’s museum does not have to be justified.

For 20 Years, the women’s museum was located on the island of Gorée. This original Museum was the first of its kind on the African continent. Up until today it presents its collections which illustrate all the phases of the life of Senegalese rural and urban women.

The main objective of the Henriette Bathily Women’s Museum is to unveil the place and the role of the Senegalese women in their communities, rituals, and popular and traditional arts.It opens up new point of views through field research, interviews, family collections, photographic reproductions, recordings and films, and archival consultations. The Museum’s magazines will attract the interest of nationals and foreigners and introduce them to an important aspect of Senegalese community life: the organization of society evolves around women. Another interest of the Senegalese Women’s Museum is that it allows non-Senegalese to enter the “intimacy” of the Senegalese society either for research, studies, academic work or simply to get to know the other. The Senegalese can themselves discover the specificities of other ethnic groups, of other communities, of other regions: customs and traditions varying between groups. In short, the Senegalese Women’s Museum, while being an educational and cultural structure is also a socio-economic organization.

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinteresttumblr

The Natinal Pioneer Women’s Hall of Fame in Alice Springs, Australia is opening a new part of the permanent exhibition “What’s Work Worth” on Thursday, 21st September 2017.

The newly-added audio and audio-visual material draws, in part, on the experiences of women and men from all walks of life in Alice Springs to continue the discussion around attitudes and perceptions to women’s paid and unpaid work and ideas on how museums represent work, particularly women’s work, gender and objects.

What’s Work Worth?” takes a broad look at Australian women’s experiences of work.  It explores this through ordinary, everyday objects.  It poses two sets of questions. First: though women’s work has changed dramatically in the last few decades, has it increased women’s worth?  Was the fight for equality a radical or, as Germaine Greer has argued, a profoundly conservative act?  Second: How do our ideas about gender mediate how we view objects?  How do the objects we like, hate, use, own or don’t own, “gender” us?  If it is true that children are conditioned by the objects they play with, is it possible that adults are also conditioned by the objects they use?

http://pioneerwomen.com.au/explore-exhibitions/womens-work

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinteresttumblr

  

The women’s museum in Fürth, Germany is led by women who speak different mother tongues who have different academic, pedagogical and artistic professions. In 1989 they founded the association Frauen in der Einen Welt – Zentrum für interkulturelle Frauenalltagsforschung und internationalen Austausch e.V. (Women in One World – Center for Intercultural Research of Women’s Everyday Life and International Exchange), under which they express their solidarity with women worldwide, the need for discussion, cooperation and learning from each other. They develop projects aimed at intercultural understanding based on the everyday experience of women. They create a framework in which women from different cultural backgrounds can confidently share, compare and connect their experiences.

The association founded the Museum Frauenkultur Regional-International (Museum Women’s Culture Regional – International) in 2006. There they create and organize exhibitions, conferences, publish books and catalogues.

Common and shared experiences, as well as differences between women worldwide, who are disputing patriarchal structures, inequality and injustice are subject of the exhibitions, always with the aim of initiating intercultural and transcultural dialogues.

Through an interdisciplinary approach and a female perspective, they introduce an alternative interpretation of known issues in museums and initiate discussions about the problems left behind. They are addressing difficult topics and dissonant heritage. They report the experience of individuals in the wider social processes. They take women’s everyday life seriously and acknowledge the day-to-day performance of women. They relate situations of women from different countries, cultures and social classes and visualize mutual dependencies from Franconia, the region where the museum is situated, to everywhere. Thy are “giving voice” to ordinary women and highlight their histories.

They collaborate with women’s research organizations, women’s museums, authors and artists from various countries and are part of IAWM – International Association of Women’s Museums. In 1993 and 2014 the organization and the Museum have been awarded for the advancement of women in Nuremberg.

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinteresttumblr
1 2 3 9