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The Museo de la Mujer Mexico has the objective of reviewing Mexico’s history with a gender approach, from the prehispanic era to the present, with the aim of making visible women’s work and their contribution to building the nation, so that the history of women in Mexico ceases to be forgotten.

The Women’s Museum is an open book to the citizens: a center for the diffusion of a new culture of equity and respect of women’s human rights.

The museum wants to raise awareness that women’s development is pivotal to achieve the overall progress of humanity, since women are not only reproducers of life, but they also reproduce cultural patterns. The Mexican Federation of University Women (FEMU) has advocated for affirmative policies to generate a new culture of peace through teaching, research and dissemination of a gender-sensitive culture. The best investment that a nation can make is in women and girl’s education, because of the multiplying effect they have among society. People can go as far as their education allows them.

Inside the building of the University Print House the Women’s Museum Mexico is displaying women’s history in 8 rooms:

ROOM 1: EQUITY, UNIVERSAL PRINCIPLE OF HARMONY

“The female is a product of nature, and the woman is a product of civilization” Alfonso Karr, slogan of the 1st Feminist Congress in Mexico, held in Mérida, Yucatán, 1970

ROOM 2: DUAL COSMIC VIEW OF ANCIENT MEXICO

“Listen, this is the time to learn here on Earth, this is the word: Heed, and from here you will take what your life will be, what you will be made of. Through a difficult place we walk, we are here on Earth. For one part an abysm, for the other, a ravine. If you don’t walk through the middle you will fall one way or another. Only in the middle one lives, only in the middle one walks.” Huehuehtlatolli, Advice from a father to a daughter

ROOM 3: NEW SPANISH MARIANISM. WOMEN AT HOME

“And for this God did not create Eve from Adam’s head, for she must know that she is no greater than her husband, neither did He make her from his foot, for she must know that woman is no less than her husband; but He made her from the middle of his ribs, so they both would know that they are equal and must encounter peace with each other.” Pedro de Córdoba, Christian Doctrine, 1544

ROOM 4: WOMEN INSURGENTS

“If we are now in the enlightened years, when everyone can speak their own minds; if everyone writes what they think, what they want, what they know or that they can; if that splendid day of the oath of our Independence has the merit of the applause of the sage, the ignorant, the rich, the poor, the child, the old, the noble and the commoner, how is it that this cannot be done by women, to whom Heaven gave, as to any other living being, their thinking brains.” María Josefa Guelberdi, 1821

ROOM 5: FREEDOM AND EDUCATION

“From the very first days of the world, the most painful, the most terrible curse weighted on women: oppression.” Laureana Wright, Women’s emancipation through education, 1891

ROOM 6: FROM TEACHERS TO REVOLUTIONARIES 

“[…] It is time for Mexican Women to recognize that their rights and obligations go further than the home.” Dolores Jiménez y Muro, September 11th, 1910

ROOM 7: WOMEN’S CITIZENSHIP

“The Mexican woman who has not excluded herself from the active part of the revolution , should not be excluded from the political part [..] the road to her dignity, from where a great part of the meaning of homeland comes from.” Hermila Galindo, speech for the request of the vote before the Constituent Congress, 1916.

ROOM 8: FROM THE FEMINIST REVOLUTION TO THE PRESENT TIME

“We are practically encountering a world revolution with great sociopolitical and economic repercussions; a sui generis revolution, the female way, without blood or violence, bold and at the same time discrete, soft and subtle, but firm and decisive, and most important, without winners or losers, which has been shaking and revolutionizing the sturdy structure of the social organization that placed women in a markedly humiliating inferior condition.” María Lavalle Urbina, Speech of the first woman Chair of the Senate, December 15th, 1965.

Website: http://www.museodelamujer.org.mx/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100010830939275

 

 

 

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The voluntary organisation “Frammenti di storia al femminile” began in Cossano Canavese in 1998 with the intent to be a point of reference for everything regard women’s culture and to have a solid and agile tool to gather, keep and spread women’s memory, aural, written and through artefacts. The foundation of a women’s museum is one of the goals of the organisation.

The organisation is inspired by Giulia Avetta, born in 1908 from Cossano, whose exemplar life was dedicated to other people.

Born to the “the world of the poor” she freed herself with work and study, making of her teaching job a mission: she wanted to free the children from poverty teaching a whole generation to read, write and use numbers. She used culture as a way for freedom and equality together with her sense of Christian service. With the same spirit Giulia worked as a mayor and led her village into the modern age bringing water into the homes and building an adequate school.

The first virtual section of the museum is dedicated to Giulia Avetta. One of the goals is the Women’s museum, that wants to gather data, objects, pictures, photos, documents and anything about women. We’ll also assemble a document centre and a Library, both open to the public. The museum will be dynamic, the meaninful and interchangable objects, teaching panels, virtual sections, photographic and doucment sections.

Frammenti di Storia al Femminile wants to promote culture and art, organise courses exhibitions, meetings, debates on women’s issues, offer a meeting place for women, and aid communities and women in need.

Therefore the museum produced videos and organised exhibitions to show the journey of women in the world: Giulia Avetta, Fragments of Women’s history, and Tiri Tesse.

For the 150th anniversary of Italian unification the museum initiative brought onto the stage “impossible interviews to women of the Risorgimento”, with the show Fragment of Women’s Risorgimento. Based on little-known women who made history, we took it to many villages in Canavese.

In 2016 the organisation did something similar with “Trenches: women’s voices in the first world war”, about women who in various ways contributed to the war (nurses, spies, intellectuals).

In 2013, with the contribution of the Comune di Torino and the Fondazione CRT the organisation published the book “With Roots We Can Fly – fragments of history for a new idea of women’s citizenship”. The book was presented in various places during 2014, and it gathers the experiences of 42 women. Their stories unfold over a century and show how women adapted to rapidly changing societies.

Anually the Organisation awards associations, bodies and people with special achievements in the fields of Education, Art and Politics. The Giulia Avetta Culture Prize is now in its eleventh edition and dedicated to Giulia Avetta.

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…a catalyst for gender equality in civic statues in the UK

The inVISIBLEwomen website launched in March 2016 at the Women of the World Festival on the Southbank in London, UK. Shockingly, only an estimated 15% of civic statues in the UK honour women so the site invites you to take part in building a statistical picture of the situation nationally.  Successful campaigning methods are highlighted and successes, both past and present are celebrated with an eye on the possibilities for the future.

To paraphrase our suffragette sisters in their struggle for votes for women, it is time for more PLINTHS FOR WOMEN!

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Interested in girls’ lifes around the globe? The Girl Museum recently published the latest edition of the newsletter Girl News International, a wonderful source of information about girls worldwide.

This is the letter from the editor, Ashley Remer, to the latest edition:

This issue is a wild one—things that I never thought would happen, let alone read in print. It seems truth is continually stranger and infinitely more disturbing than fiction. However, there are also amazing stories of hope and overcoming obstacles to reaffirm your knowledge that girls are more than just survivors, they are conquerors.

I hope you are inspired and enraged in equal measures.

With strength and hope,

Ashley E. Remer
Editor

And here you can read and subscribe: http://paper.li/e-1478952107#/

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Member of IAWM since its foundation in 2009.

The Museo de las Mujeres Costa Rica exists since 2009 and is administrated by Claudia Mandel Katz and her family. The rooms are spreading over 50 sqm on the last upper floor and terrace of their own house in San José, Costa Rica. They receive groups of students from public universities which are interested in gender topics to see their permanent collection.

The objects in their exhibition range are paintings, sculptures, photographs and objects donated by artists around female specific topics. Their research section is particularly interesting, where they share research from authors from different countries and disciplines who share a feminist approach to their research topics.

The women’s museum Costa Rica is considered not only as a place to look at, but as a place to experience, to discuss in workshops and meetings. It concentrates in topics such as stereotypes and female identity, gender violence and works with various communities in Costa Rica.

  1. Photography workshops “Self-portrait through objects” with support from the Joint Institute for Social Aid and INAMU. Participants: women of three communities: Paraíso de Cartago, Santa Lucia de Heredia and Cartago Oreamuno.

March 8, 2010. International Women’s Day. Presentation of the art exhibition and conference by Elia Arce. Culture Center in Greece, Costa Rica.

March 17, 2011. Presentation of the results of the Economic Project: “Focusing on Latin America” by the International Women’s Museum, San Francisco USA (IMOW). Culture Center in Greece, Costa Rica.

November 22, 2011. Award Ceremony of the First National Photography Competition “Zero Violence against women” in UNED with sponsorship of Banco Popular.

 

The Museum of Women of Costa Rica also participates and supports International Cooperation Projects

Participation and support for the IV Congress of Gender Studies Network in Northern Mexico in the borders of violence: theoretical and methodological approaches, reflections, experiences and policies. México, Baja California, November 23, 2012

2012 Participation in the Exhibition of Photography “Yesterday and Today of Women” organized by the Museum of Women of Argentina for International Human Rights Day, group show.

2013 Museums platform virtual courses Argentina- México- Costa Rica.

Since 2015 the Museum of Women of Costa Rica coordinates with the University of Costa Rica the project Women in the Patriarchal Society. This is a proposal that seeks to permeate the consciousness of various social groups in favor of the value of women in society. This is an initiative of the Museum of Women, which gets to work through students of the School of Philosophy at the University of Costa Rica. See article in this link: http://accionsocial.ucr.ac.cr/noticias/adolescentes-reflexionan-violencia-contra-mujeres

2015 Workshop at SIFAIS, La Carpio, San José, Costa Rica. TC-644 “Art and women in patriarchal society”.

2015 Workshop at Anastasio Alfaro College. TCU-644 “Art and women in patriarchal society”.

2015 Workshop at Vargas Calvo College. TCU-644 “Art and women in patriarchal society”.

Website: museodelasmujeres.co.cr

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Museo-de-las-Mujeres-129097077196024/

Current Virtual Exhibition: Luz Darriba, multidisciplinary artist

http://museodelasmujeres.co.cr/2016/10/luz-darriba-artista-multidisciplinar/

Luz Darriba. La sangre de las mariposas

 

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04.03.2013 Pic on Molesworth street, launch of Women’s Museum of Ireland, from left Sinead Mercier, Ciara Greene, Louise Fizgerald, Aine Kelly and Rossa Abbott.

The Women’s Museum of Ireland was founded in November 2012 as a project that aimed to promote the formal recognition of the role of women in Irish history as well as the role of Irish women abroad.

The museum’s first event was the exhibition, Monster’s of Creation: Snapshots of Women in Higher Education, which displayed images of pioneering Irish women in higher education in Ireland. For this exhibition the museum asked the public to contribute their own images to the museum to show the amazing range of achievments of women in university and higher education. 

Since it’s launch the museum has worked to educate the public about the contributions of women to cultural, political and social history in Ireland, and the role Irish women have played overseas. The museum primarily exists as a virtual museum but has hosted several pop-up events around Dublin. The museum’s next project is the Women of Dublin project, which will create a new map of the city of Dublin which will highlight the contributions that women have made to the history and development of the city. 

 

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Artist: Sonia Chitrakar (10 years old)
Year: 2008
Medium: Vegetable colours on paper backed by recycled sari fabric
Form: Patachitra
Region: West Bengal

The word “Zubaan” means tongue, language or voice. Since 2003 Zubaan is giving a voice to women by publishing books on, for, by and about women in South Asia. Zubaan is India’s first feminist publishing house, but is also a research centre and an initiative for a women’s museum.

Since the beginning of 2014 Zubaan has worked on assessing the possibility of setting up a women’s museum in New Delhi, India. Using research from museums all over the world and conversations with curators, administrators, artists, and activists, it prepared a report of recommendations and learnings for the Institute of International Education. Since then Zubaan has been searching for funding opportunities and participating in independent curatorial events and resource-creating activities in line with this agenda.

 

This artwork by Sonia Chitrakar is part of the Poster Women project. It is a visual mapping of the women’s movement in India through the posters the movement had produced. This is only one of the many fascinating projects Zubaan is curating and we invite you to find out more on their website: http://zubaanbooks.com/.

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The question Nadia Murad wants to ask the UN security council is “Why is it taking so long?”

Nadia Murad is one of over 7000 Yazidi women and children who were kidnapped by the IS in 2014. Now she pleads to the government of Iraq and the United Nations to finally investigate these crimes. The victims of the IS should finally receive the justice they deserve.


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Para vérsion en espagnol, véase más abajo

In 2006 a group of women, professionals and feminists, kicked off the activities MUSEUM OF WOMEN, by then unprecedented initiative in Latin America and with few precedents in the world. While the creation of the museum had been proposed in 1989 to the Directorate of Museums of the City of Buenos Aires by historian Graciela Tejero Coni the project floundered in official circles, and had to wait until it became a private museum (IGJ Nª 732 / 06).

Since its opening the museum meets the objectives of defending the rights of women and being a source of awareness of gender oppression.

It has formed a team of specialists in different disciplines that drive a specific file and museological reservoir of cultural history of women, promotion and production of art and culture of women, who make history with the people.

The action of the museum is guided by the following principles: defending a scientific and popular culture; the vindication of the rights and interests of women; the fight against the double oppression and gender subordination; the rescue and dissemination of cultural values ​​of intellectuals and artists in the country, Latin America and the world, especially the national sense of culture and the vindication of indigenous people.

The museum is oriented on “New museology” that goes far beyond the idea of ​​”tight reservoir of unused parts”, but includes and invites visitors to interact, have fun, learn and contribute from their own experience and memories.

The museum does not receive permanent financing of official or private entities and does receive financial support from its members and friends.

In 2008 the Museo de la Mujer Argentina was a founding member of the International Network of Museums of Women in the world, transformed since 2012 in IAWM – International Women’s Association of Museums.


En el año 2006 un grupo de mujeres, profesionales y feministas, dieron inicio a las actividades del MUSEO DE LA MUJER, iniciativa para entonces inédita en América Latina y con pocos antecedentes en el mundo. Si bien la creación del museo había sido propuesta en 1989 a la Dirección de Museos de la Municipalidad de Buenos Aires por la historiadora Graciela Tejero Coni el proyecto no prosperó en los ámbitos oficiales, y debió esperar hasta transformarse en un museo privado (IGJ Nª 732/06).

Desde su apertura cumple los objetivos de defender los derechos de las mujeres y ser un recurso de concienciación sobre la opresión de género, lo que le ha valido ser declarado de interés cultural por el Honorable Congreso de la Nación (O.D.2378 de junio 2007).

Ha constituido un equipo de especialistas en diferentes disciplinas que impulsan un archivo y reservorio museológico específico de la historia cultural de las mujeres, la promoción y producción del arte y la cultura de las mujeres, que hacen historia junto al pueblo.

Guía su acción los principios de la defensa de una cultura científica y popular; la reivindicación de los derechos e intereses de las mujeres; la lucha contra su doble opresión y subordinación de género; el rescate y difusión de los valores culturales de intelectuales y artistas del país, de Latinoamérica y del mundo, en especial el sentido nacional de la cultura y la reivindicación de los pueblos originarios.

Orienta su propuesta la línea de “Nueva museología” que supera ampliamente la idea de “reservorio estanco de piezas en desuso”, sino que lo incluye resignificándolo para invitar a interactuar, divertirse, aprender y aportar desde la propia experiencia y memoria.

El museo no recibe financiación permanente de entes oficiales ni privados y sí recibe el apoyo económico de sus socias y amigas.

En el año 2008 fue miembro fundador de la Red Internacional de Museos de las Mujeres en el mundo, transformada desde el año 2013 en IAWM – International Association of Women´s Museums.

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Zubaan, the first feminist publishing house in India, started this week with this new and amazing E-Essays Project. This project wants to make feminist knowledge and academic research more easily accessible.

For nearly fifteen years, Zubaan has been publishing quality content in gender-related fields. For the first time this new project makes it possible to purchase single e-essays for a reasonable fee. Each week more essays will be available for purchase and, each month, a new essay is available for free with any other purchase.

This weeks releases focus on the theme of the challenges and strengths of the women’s movement in India.

Upcoming essays will populate the following themes: Trauma, Exile, Important figures, Legislation, Expanding feminism/theory, Patriarchy, Health, Reproductive health, Religion/communalism, Work and labour, Civil society, Methodology, Family & kinship, Testimonials, Autobiography, Education, Sexual violence, Home and domestic spaces, Women’s movements, Religion & conflict, State crimes & impunity.

This months free essay “Towards a Feminist Politics? The Indian Women’s Movement in Historical Perspective” by Samita Sen traces the history of the Indian Women’s Movement from the 1920s to the present day.

Here you can subscribe to the e-essays mailer in order to be informed about the current available e-essays.

 

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