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May we introduce our member… the Museo de la Mujer in Mexico

The Museo de la Mujer Mexico has the objective of reviewing Mexico’s history with a gender approach, from the prehispanic era to the present, with the aim of making visible women’s work and their contribution to building the nation, so that the history of women in Mexico ceases to be forgotten.

The Women’s Museum is an open book to the citizens: a center for the diffusion of a new culture of equity and respect of women’s human rights.

The museum wants to raise awareness that women’s development is pivotal to achieve the overall progress of humanity, since women are not only reproducers of life, but they also reproduce cultural patterns. The Mexican Federation of University Women (FEMU) has advocated for affirmative policies to generate a new culture of peace through teaching, research and dissemination of a gender-sensitive culture. The best investment that a nation can make is in women and girl’s education, because of the multiplying effect they have among society. People can go as far as their education allows them.

Inside the building of the University Print House the Women’s Museum Mexico is displaying women’s history in 8 rooms:

ROOM 1: EQUITY, UNIVERSAL PRINCIPLE OF HARMONY

“The female is a product of nature, and the woman is a product of civilization” Alfonso Karr, slogan of the 1st Feminist Congress in Mexico, held in Mérida, Yucatán, 1970

ROOM 2: DUAL COSMIC VIEW OF ANCIENT MEXICO

“Listen, this is the time to learn here on Earth, this is the word: Heed, and from here you will take what your life will be, what you will be made of. Through a difficult place we walk, we are here on Earth. For one part an abysm, for the other, a ravine. If you don’t walk through the middle you will fall one way or another. Only in the middle one lives, only in the middle one walks.” Huehuehtlatolli, Advice from a father to a daughter

ROOM 3: NEW SPANISH MARIANISM. WOMEN AT HOME

“And for this God did not create Eve from Adam’s head, for she must know that she is no greater than her husband, neither did He make her from his foot, for she must know that woman is no less than her husband; but He made her from the middle of his ribs, so they both would know that they are equal and must encounter peace with each other.” Pedro de Córdoba, Christian Doctrine, 1544

ROOM 4: WOMEN INSURGENTS

“If we are now in the enlightened years, when everyone can speak their own minds; if everyone writes what they think, what they want, what they know or that they can; if that splendid day of the oath of our Independence has the merit of the applause of the sage, the ignorant, the rich, the poor, the child, the old, the noble and the commoner, how is it that this cannot be done by women, to whom Heaven gave, as to any other living being, their thinking brains.” María Josefa Guelberdi, 1821

ROOM 5: FREEDOM AND EDUCATION

“From the very first days of the world, the most painful, the most terrible curse weighted on women: oppression.” Laureana Wright, Women’s emancipation through education, 1891

ROOM 6: FROM TEACHERS TO REVOLUTIONARIES 

“[…] It is time for Mexican Women to recognize that their rights and obligations go further than the home.” Dolores Jiménez y Muro, September 11th, 1910

ROOM 7: WOMEN’S CITIZENSHIP

“The Mexican woman who has not excluded herself from the active part of the revolution , should not be excluded from the political part [..] the road to her dignity, from where a great part of the meaning of homeland comes from.” Hermila Galindo, speech for the request of the vote before the Constituent Congress, 1916.

ROOM 8: FROM THE FEMINIST REVOLUTION TO THE PRESENT TIME

“We are practically encountering a world revolution with great sociopolitical and economic repercussions; a sui generis revolution, the female way, without blood or violence, bold and at the same time discrete, soft and subtle, but firm and decisive, and most important, without winners or losers, which has been shaking and revolutionizing the sturdy structure of the social organization that placed women in a markedly humiliating inferior condition.” María Lavalle Urbina, Speech of the first woman Chair of the Senate, December 15th, 1965.

Website: http://www.museodelamujer.org.mx/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100010830939275

 

 

 

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